Tag Archives: Chick Corea

JAZZ DAY

Although quite a lot of jazz is played at Vinyl Connection headquarters, I rarely write about it. There are a couple of reasons. Firstly, I am less confident writing about America’s contribution to world music; it somehow seems harder to capture in words than rock. Perhaps the language of jazz is less comfortable, less familiar. […]

I LOVE MILES

(BUT NOT ALL HIS BOOTS) I love Miles Davis. Whether as a contributing midwife to the Birth of the Cool, the ultra-hip trumpeter of the late 50s, the restless innovator of the 60s, or inspiring bandleader and outta-space musician of the 70s, his is an endlessly varied—and indeed endless—catalogue. If you are browsing a shop […]

TAKING FLIGHT

What was it drew me to pick up the blue on blue album with a banking seabird, wingtip to water, blurring the sea to azure glass? Was it the sense of movement as the bird fused air and liquid with breathtaking confidence and grace? Perhaps the sea itself; pale like an ice floe, smooth as […]

AN EVENING WITH HERBIE HANCOCK AND CHICK COREA, MAY 2015

The Melbourne International Jazz Festival began in 1998, co-incidentally the year that the Ms Connection/Vinyl Connection international festival kicked off too. Seventeen years on, both are still going strong though artists in both arenas seem to be a touch more, er, mature. Seasoned. Venerable. Ah shit. We’re all older. Nevertheless, when we noticed that the […]

SEABIRD [COVERART PAIR #37]

Chick Corea “Return To Forever”  [ECM 1972]  /  John Sangster “Paradise, Volume 1”  [Trinity 1973] * “Seabird” Alessi Brothers [1976] * The Chick Corea album is often referred to as the first by his subsequent band Return To Forever but this LP was released under his own name. John Sangster was an Australian jazz musician […]

TRANSCENDENTAL (NEW) MUSIC

Josef Zawinul wrote the melody ‘In a silent way’ after visiting his Austrian family for Christmas. It is a wistful, almost folky melody that you can hear on the composer’s self-titled 1971 album. But more famously and influentially the tune became the title for a 1969 album that indicated a far-reaching change of direction for […]