Tag Archives: 70s electronica

KLAUS ENCOUNTERS | DEPARTURE AND RETURN

A Dozen Klaus Schulze Albums Worthy Of Consideration When Klaus Schulze died on 26 April 2022 the world lost one of its foundation rock-electronic composers and a cornerstone of the early German indie music scene that became known as ‘Krautrock’. As someone who discovered his drifting, droning, pulsating synthesiser music back in the 1970s, I […]

DREAM OF HADES

How many times have you bought the same album? I don’t mean by accident—that’s simply forgetfulness, a free giveaway from Universal Ageing Inc—but because some new and improved whiz-bang re-issue of one of your favourites has appeared. Of course there’s always a sweetener. The lure of restored artwork, a promise of revelatory sound, alternate versions, […]

DUNE, CHAPTER THREE

“Another Klaus Encounter” In an article a few months back, Vinyl Connection dipped into the massive Klaus Schulze catalogue for the first time (here). One of the reasons it took so long to write about this key electronic artist was the sheer quantity of high-class albums Herr Schulze has produced since his 1972 debut. Fortunately, […]

KLAUS ENCOUNTERS

Berlin native Klaus Schulze formed his first band—Psy Free—in 1967. He was part of the birth of Tangerine Dream, playing on their debut Electronic Meditation, joined Manuel Göttsching in Ash Ra Temple for a while, and was an important part of the Cosmic Couriers team. Although revered for his role as a major innovator and […]

TEN FROM 77 – 3 / ELECTRONIC – 2

Continuing (and concluding) a rather indulgent journey through albums released in 1977 broadly falling into the ‘electronic’ category. Having covered 10 – 6, here are the Top 5. 5  Jürgen Karg — Elektronische Mythen Herr Karg played bass with jazz experimentalist Wolfgang Dauner on a (semi-) legendary 1969 recording. Eight years later he released his […]

TEN FROM 77 – 2 / ELECTRONIC – 1

It seemed a fine idea to whip up a list of favourite 1977 releases; a straightforward, accessible and hopefully entertaining article. Things started well enough, with the first post of rock-pop albums eliciting plenty of commentary as people compared their own choices to the Vinyl Connection offering. But there was such variety in the VC […]